Michael Doornbos

Let's void some warranties

Michael is the founder of Evadot.com, PR Coordinator at Part Time Scientists and Product Designer at SimplyHome. A security consultant, speaker, and podcaster, Michael helps companies find their true role on the fast-changing internet.

So about Star Wars...

I'm jumping off of the Star Wars bandwagon.

I don't want to see 28 other story lines in this universe. I don't want Han Solo's back story movies. I don't need explanations of how the force works, or why the Rogue squadron was so important.


I do understand that I may have to turn in my geek card but that's a consequence I'm willing to bear.


I'm in the camp that there are 3 Star Wars movies. Two really really great ones, and one that lost it's way trying to sell toys. They have not been edited from the theatrical versions.

For me the franchise ended in 1983.

Pulling the wool over my eyes now.

A case of the mondays

I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something
— Steve Jobs

Feeling this one today.

I must have all of the maps

I am a somewhat reluctant weekend companion for Julie when it comes to antique and old stuff stores.

I dragged my feet for much of the morning doing my normal "don't poke the bear routine" (why she puts up with me is anyone's guess). Then we got to "Scavengers" which is a new place for us.

The first room was the usual, dressers with potential, desks that need to be stripped and sanded. You know, fun stuff. Just fun stuff for people who aren't me.

Then I turn the corner and step into the very old warehouse. There are rows and rows of these drawers with names of states on the front of them. Okay, these are cool, they'd make cool storage. I wonder how much they are and open one.

Each drawer had at least two inches of US Geological Survey maps Ranging from 1965 to 1991 in many of the states in the Union.

Okay, this is more my thing. I set out on a search through the pretty disorganized collection. A quick query to the owner and he says that they bought the whole collection and they don't print these on paper any more.

Now I have a mission.


Meanwhile, Julie is watching me run around looking for ladders, sweating a lot (crap it was hot in there), and rummaging through stacks of old paper.


Then I found what I was looking for.


Hartford Michigan (from 1981) and Coloma Michigan (from 1970).


This is a really long story to point out that THESE PLACES SOMETIMES HAVE MAPS..


I really like maps.


THESE MAPS ARE NOW MINE.


The end.

More chip pile measuring

Working outside with flying robots. Yes please.

Retirement for an EA-6B

Attended a retirement for a Marine Prowler today. She'll be permanently on display at Hickory Airport. Was great to share some memories with friends and family and hear the roar of a pair of J-52s one last time. Love love love this airplane.

Measuring chip piles with Unmanned Vehicles

A local paper mill has three large piles of wood chips that get replenished by 20 to 30 trucks every day. They have a requirement that these piles get measured monthly. This task is typically done by two surveyors, one of whom has to actually climb to the top of these piles which is a little bit like trying to walk through waist deep snow. It takes the better part of two days.

Using our 3D Robotics Solo platform we were able to gather the data to measure these piles in about 20 minutes. 

The next step to compare the data gathered from the aerial platform with the surveyors data. As the computers finish crunching all of the high resolution data we will know how accurate the solution is. If it works reasonably well there is a good case for the paper mill to start using it regularly since it's somewhere in the vicinity of $1000 per day cheaper.

Ideas are mostly worthless on their own

Ideas are pretty useless in and of themselves. Everyone has ideas! I have to repress a cringe whenever someone says to an author, “I have a great idea for a book—say, maybe you could write it!” as though writing the book were a formality, and what was really needed was someone to come in and supervise with great Ideas.
— David W Brown

 

 

Confession Time

One of my biggest personal problems is sitting back when it gets easy. I've never ever ever experienced anything good because of this personal habit. Just a reminder to myself as we start a new month to never be content. 

There's more to do than can EVER be done and I can't think of anything MORE exciting than that.

Nobody got anywhere in the world by simply being content.
— Louis L’Amour US novelist of westerns (1908 – 1988)

The luxury of being ordinary

Enriched by a singular event that is larger than life, I no longer have the luxury of being ordinary. To stand on the lunar surface and look back at our Earth creates such a personal sense of awe that even Alan Shepard wept at the view. Trying to exist within the paradox of being in this world after visiting another may be why some Moon voyagers tend to be reclusive.
— Eugene Cernan

Don't be comfortable

It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. The went out and happened to things
— Leonardo Da Vinci

"It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. The went out and happened to things" -Leonardo Da Vinci  

FAA Administrator Talks Drones at SXSW

"FAA Administrator Michael Huerta and Sally French, "The Drone Girl," today led a lively panel discussion about the future of small unmanned aircraft at South by Southwest (SXSW) in Austin on Monday. The panel included a diverse group of innovative thinkers from industry and government.

In his opening remarks, Administrator Huerta outlined recent progress on several important initiatives, including a robust unmanned aircraft system (UAS) registration system that is expected to pass 400,000 registrants this week, the MicroUAS aviation rulemaking committee that will deliver recommendations to the FAA by April 1, and the FAA’s B4UFLY app for iOS and Android devices. He noted partnerships among the FAA, industry and other government agencies are key to safely and expeditiously integrating unmanned aircraft into our skies.

"The wide array of industry representatives here today underscores that while we may sometimes have different opinions and ideas, we’re all coming from essentially the same place: We all view safety as our top priority, and the safe integration of unmanned aircraft is a goal that we’re committed to pursuing together," Huerta said.

The panel discussion included representatives from NASA, Amazon Prime Air, Intel, PrecisionHawk, Aerobo and Fresh Air Educators. Topics included steps to speed integration while maintaining today’s high levels of safety, future uses for UAS, research on how to safely expand UAS operations, and ways to spread the FAA's safety message to even more UAS pilots. One message that came through from the participants was that partnerships between government and industry are essential to educating the public on how to fly carefully and to safely integrating unmanned aircraft into the nation's airspace.

Helping people understand where they can and can’t fly their unmanned aircraft is critical and the FAA is counting on industry’s support. Many UAS users have no experience with the U.S. aviation system, so they may not be aware they’re operating in shared, and potentially busy airspace.

Huerta announced the Android version of the FAA’s B4UFLY app is now publicly available. The app tells pilots whether it’s safe to fly in their current or planned locations. The Android version includes updates to its beta version based on feedback from drone operators who tested the app. Huerta also committed to making the app’s programming and logic available to the general public.

The FAA is committed to the safe integration of unmanned aircraft into the national airspace system. The FAA’s website has important information for drone owners on registration, flying guidance for hobby or recreation use, commercial operations, public/government operations, law enforcement guidance, educational campaigns, and more. The FAA plans to publish a rule for small unmanned aircraft this spring. The agency has authorized more than 4,000 exemptions for commercial operations, and works with our research partners through the UAS Center of Excellence, six test sites, and the Pathfinder program."

From the FAA Website/Press Release

 

Copyright 2016 by Michael Doornbos